PATHOLOGY & ONCOLOGY RESEARCHVol. 2 No. 1, 1996

 Review

Inflammatory and Physiological Roles of Chemokines

Antal ROT

Experimental Molecular Pathology, Department of Dermatology, Sandoz Research Institute, Vienna, Italy

 

Chemokines, members of the family of chemotactic peptides, have a well documented function in different inflammatory diseases where they induce leukocyte emigration into lesions. Several recent observations indicate that, in addition to pathological states, chemokines are also produced and secreted under physiological conditions by various exocrine glands in amounts sufficient for their full biological effect. The glands involved in chemokine production and secretion include eccrine sweat glands, lactating mammary glands, lacrimal and salivary glands. It is suggested that analogous to their role in inflammatory diseases, chemokines produced by the exocrine glands are responsible for the induction of homeostatic leukocyte migration into mucosal epithelia and skin and also, mammary glands and milk. In addition, the mechanism by which chemokines induce leukocyte homing under physiological circumstances is discussed. Pathology & Oncology Research, Vol 2, Nr 1, 16-20, 1996

Key words: IL-8; MCP-1; RANTES; inflammation; sweat; milk; leukocytes


Received: Feb 8, 1996; accepted: Mar 2, 1996
Correspondence: Antal ROT, Experimental Molecular Pathology, Department of Dermatology, Sandoz Research Institute, Brunner Str. 59. Vienna A-1235, Italy

Click here to get the full-text version in PDF!
ad